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in texas in the 1890s, and he turned it into the most successful small railroad, the texas midland railroad, in the state, and then he did a number of things like going back to new bedford, built a brand new house on the family property, and turned that into a center for radio technology and meteorology, gave it to the united states government during world war ii, and so he was dn he had one of the greatest collection of coins and stamps. he really made a mark for himself. yeah? >> one of the things that strikes me about the guilded age and the wealth is that there were a lot of wealthy people who believed in giving back to society like app drew carnegie. did she donate money to public service? >> she never did it publicly. she would dismiss any suggestion that she had, but then her son said and others had said, that there were -- there were plenty of places she gave to or people she gave to. she never wanted it known. she felt she was hounded for her money, constantly getting letters besieging her. she tried to keep it as quiet as possible, and there's no proof. there's no proof. because o
midland railroad, in the state. then he did a number about things. he went back to new bedford to build a brand new house on the family property and turned it into a center for radio technology and meteorology. gave it to the united states government during world war ii. and, so he was, he had the, is one of the greatest collection of coins and stamps. so he really made a mark to himself. yeah? >> [inaudible]. one of the things that strikes me about the guilded age and the wealth were a lot of wealthy people who believed in give back to society, particularly someone like andrew carnegie. did she donate any of her money to public service >> she never did it publicly and dismissed that she had. her son shade there were plenty of people she gave to. she never wanted it known. she was hounded for her money. she was constantly getting letters beseeching her for money. yeah, so she tried to keep it as quiet as possible. there is no proof, there is no proof. because other people said it at the time, she had a very close friend whose name is ann leery who lived in the neighborhood her who was a
in the west midlands over the past 12 months? and congratulate them on their performance which is down 31%, down 29% in my area. does the fall in crime show police reform is working? >> i think my honorable friend biggs important point. we've seen not just recorded crime fall by 60% from but also the crime survey showing crime falling by 6%. this is at a time where making difficult decisions about police funding but that combination of police reform, the changes we're making and tougher approach to criminal justice is seeing crime falling and public satisfaction with the police going up. >> last year, mr. speaker, the prime minister told a house that there was no reason why front-line police officer numbers need to go down. yet my constituency are telling me they're seeing fewer police on our streets. isn't the real truth, prime minister competitor 6800 fewer police officers since he came to power? >> what is happening is the number of neighborhood police officers has gone up by 2360 cents 2010. >> sir peter bell and. >> -- sir peter bone. >> last week planning commission was granted for
government, and during the boom years, for instance, in the west midlands there were no net new private sector jobs. he's dealing with the big issues. what a pity that all he can do is stand up and try and read out a quote. >> ed milliband. >> mr. speaker, he says the report is on the right track, goodness knows what he would have said if it was on the wrong track. business has no confidence in him, and deregulation -- his chosen approach -- is not the answer. now, let me turn to a specific area of the report, recommendation 61 which i'm sure he's familiar with. [laughter] he says, and i quote: the government needs to set out a definitive and unambiguous energy policy. [laughter] this is, obviously, mr. speaker, an appropriate day to be considering this recommendation on energy after the last 20 -- it's good to see the business secretary down the bench, by the way. i'm sorry that growth committee that he's on is so unmemorable that he can't remember it. this is an appropriate day to be considering this recommendation. so his energy -- i'm rather enjoying this, mr. speaker. his energy se
daniels midland and that was made into a movie with matt damon in 2009. he wrote conspiracy of fools, that dealt with the enron scandal land issues that broth and run down. he was a writer and didn't -- investigative reporter for the new york times and later with the business magazine portfolio. he is a renaissance man when it comes to subject matter, he has done investigative reporting on such diverse topics as the clinton pardons, the wall street scandal, child pornography and exploitation on the internet. today we talk about his new book "500 days," which is a book that essentially begins at or about 911 and concludes as we commence the war in iraq. please welcome kurt eichenwald. >> thank you. >> the first question is why this book, particularly given the amount of time that has intervened between the commencement and the iraq war and numerous books that have dealt with it? >> the biggest reason is i have never been one to believe that you get the right history from newspapers or magazines or even the first takes. the top book on the bestseller list is about abe lincoln and he ha
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)